, September 26, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

Sept. 2: Breast cancer medicines may force some cancer cells into ‘sleeper mode’, allowing them to potentially come back to life years after initial treatment. Researchers studied a group of breast cancer drugs called hormone treatments, and they say their research opens avenues for finding ways of keeping the cancer cells dormant for longer, or even potentially finding a way of awakening the cells so they can then be killed by the treatment. Read the full story HERE on Science Daily.

Sept. 9: According to a recent study, women who had experienced breast cancer and who followed a low fat diet with a corresponding increase in vegetables, fruit, and grains were 15–35% less likely to die from any cause. Read more in Medical News Today HERE.

Sept. 23: In a recent study led by University at Buffalo and University of Puerto Rico researchers, those studied who consumed sofrito (a condiment with primary ingredients of onion and garlic) more than once per day had a 67% decrease in risk compared to women who never ate it. The idea for the study stemmed from previous scientific evidence showing that eating onions and garlic may have a protective effect against cancer. Read the whole story in Science Daily HERE.

Sept. 26: Young survivors of breast cancer face higher risk for late congestive heart failure than their counterparts without cancer, according to study results published in Cancer. Read the full article in HemOnc Today HERE.

, September 09, 2019 | More Post by

Welcome to our blog series, “Mission Moment!” It’s a snapshot of the impact our mission and programs have on the women we serve. If you have any questions about Here for the Girls support services and programs, email the program team at support@hereforthegirls.org!

Every year H4TG selects 12 members (aka Boobers!) to be featured in our annual calendar and to serve as ambassadors for the organization. Part of the requirement to be a calendar model is fundraising. Each model is given a fundraising goal to be reached by the end of the calendar year. One of our most recent models elected to gift funds she raised to another calendar model. She had already reached her goal and wanted to help her fellow sister reach her goal as well. She told us that, “teamwork makes the dream work,” and that she is “here for the girls!” That’s what we are all about – we will continue to band together to live out our mission!

, September 03, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

Aug. 7: A new study found women who switched to poultry from beef, lamb or pork were 28 percent less likely to get breast tumors. It also shows those who ate the most red meat overall, had a 23 percent higher risk of the disease to those who rarely consumed it. Read the full story on the New York Post HERE.

Aug. 8: Electromagnetic fields might help prevent some breast cancers from spreading to other parts of the body, new research has found. Read the full story in Science Daily HERE.

Aug. 10: Researchers have been able to coax human breast cancer cells to turn into fat cells in a new proof-of-concept study in mice. The researchers took mice implanted with an aggressive form of human breast cancer, and treated them with both a diabetic drug called rosiglitazone and a cancer treatment called trametinib, which caused the cancer cells to change to fat cells. Read more in Science Alert HERE.

Aug. 26: A team of researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital has developed an innovative way to knock out a gene connected to triple-negative breast cancer (called Lipocalin 2) using the editing system CRISPR and has shown its potential for treating triple-negative breast tumors in mice. Read the full story in FierceBiotech HERE.

Aug. 29: A new analysis adds to the evidence that many women who take hormone therapy during menopause are more likely to develop breast cancer — and remain at higher risk of cancer for more than a decade after they stop taking the drugs. The full story is in STAT News HERE.

 

, September 03, 2019 | More Post by

44, diagnosed at 42

2nd degree family history, no known mutation

Shannon, mother of two teens, wife, and virtual assistant, had cervical cancer at age 37 and a family history of breast cancer prompting her doctor to order annual breast MRIs. Her first MRI found suspicious areas in her right breast. Testing confirmed Stage 1 breast cancer, and she opted for a bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction. Shannon’s first battle with cancer was private with just her devoted husband and family for support as she detached from friends she felt couldn’t understand. With the second diagnosis, she turned outward, not inward and found a mission she calls “Reflect Ripples,” to help women through their “storms.” Attending the annual Here for the Girls retreat was “the best decision” because she uncovered the emptiness left by her first battle and found sisters to help her heal through the next. Of her character, Shannon says, “Mistress Miller and I are kindred spirits. We both are strong, resourceful women who found ways to rise above the challenge of seemingly impossible tasks – hers to spin straw into gold and mine to conquer cancer twice. I am now a better version of myself and able to spin the fear, sadness, and depression into gold – a mission of helping others, as I was helped.”