, July 01, 2020 | More Post by

43, diagnosed at 38,

No family history, no known genetic mutation

Through a breast self-exam, Jennifer detected a lump in her breast that turned out to be stage 3A breast cancer. She received chemo, a bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction, and radiation. Her diagnosis occurred just as Jennifer was going through a difficult separation from her husband. While undergoing treatment, she continued working as a corrections case manager to provide for her two daughters. With no other family around, her daughters were her primary source of support, and knowing they were scared, Jennifer tried to keep life as normal as possible. She found H4TG after treatment. “I wasn’t sure what to expect, but right away the ladies welcomed me with open arms and hearts.” Jennifer says she has always been an “in the background” type of person, but she doesn’t want to be that any longer. “I want to be an example for my two daughters, that if they set their mind to something, they can do it. I want them to be proud that I’m their mom.” Jennifer admires that same ideal that emerged in the 1920s saying, “Women received their voices, and their opinions and thoughts meant something.” Jennifer also wishes to show other women that they are stronger than they think.

, July 01, 2020 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

June 1: In a geographically and ethnically diverse study of young women with newly diagnosed breast cancer in the United States, a substantial portion had concerns about fertility that potentially affected treatment decisions, according to a recent study. Read the full article in Clinical Oncology News HERE.

June 2: Researchers have identified a gene that causes an aggressive form of breast cancer to rapidly grow. More importantly, they have also discovered a way to ”turn it off” and inhibit cancer from occurring. The animal study results have been so compelling that the team is now working on FDA approval to begin clinical trials. Read the full story HERE in Science Daily.

June 10: According to recent research, a strong romantic relationship was linked to lower psychological stress and lower inflammation for women with breast cancer. Read more in Health Day HERE.

June 15: Breast cancer treatment costs are highest among young and middle-aged women with advanced breast cancer, according to a recent study. Average monthly treatment costs among 18- to 44-year-olds were $4,463 for those with metastatic breast cancer and $2,418 for those with stage 1 cancer. Read the full story in Health Day HERE.

June 30: When a solid cancer is surgically removed, any small piece that is left behind increases the chance of a local recurrence or spread. In a pilot study of dogs with mammary tumors, a disease very similar to human breast cancer, a team found that an injectable dye, which glows under near-infrared light, illuminated cancerous growth in the primary tumor as well as in lymph nodes. Read more in Science Daily HERE.