, September 24, 2013 | More Post by

 

Breast cancer is an older woman’s disease, right? WRONG! Breast cancer can strike anyone, male or female, young or old, family history of breast cancer or not. It’s definitely less common in younger women, but about five percent of new breast cancer diagnoses involve women under age 40.

We’re not telling you this to scare you. We’re telling you because we want to empower you to take charge of your breast health!

3 Things Every Young Woman Should Take to Heart

  • Get familiar with your breasts. Don’t be shy about touching them. That way you’ll be aware of changes early on. If you find a lump, don’t panic – most turn out to be noncancerous, but it’s worth finding out, don’t you think?
  • Listen to your body and to your intuition. Don’t let anyone tell you you’re too young to have breast cancer. If you have concerns, see your doctor. Request an examination and additional screening that may validate or disprove your concern.
  • Don’t let fear of breast cancer keep you from taking the steps necessary to monitor your breast health. Ignoring the possibility of breast cancer won’t prevent you from getting it, but it may prevent you from catching it in its earliest stages when the survival rate is highest.

What we know now from experience, we want you to know ahead of time. Please take it to heart. It could save your life.

You’ve got a lot of people counting on you and so much yet to experience. We are living proof that breast cancer doesn’t have to be a death sentence; it may even result in a new appreciation and enthusiasm for life.

For more information on managing breast cancer risk, read our: Things We Wish We Had Known. And if you’re confused about whether or not you should have a mammogram, you’re not alone. Beyond Boobs! weighed on the latest research: Younger Women Need Mammograms, says new study.

Our Boobers (people who have or have had breast cancer) and Boostiers (volunteers and supporters) are always up to something. Sign up for our newsletter and we’ll keep you up-to-date on what they – and we – are up to.

If you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer, what do you know now that you wish you’d known before? Leave a comment and let us know.

 

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