, December 24, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

Dec. 4: Scientists at the National Institutes of Health found that women who use permanent hair dye and chemical hair straighteners have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don’t use these products. The study published in the International Journal of Cancer and suggests that breast cancer risk increased with more frequent use of these chemical hair products. Read more on the National Institute for Health website HERE.

Dec. 9: A recent study indicates that even light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with elevated cancer (including breast cancer) risks. In the study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption. Science Daily has the whole story HERE.

Dec. 12: A research team has previously shown that fatty particles from the bloodstream may boost the growth of breast cancer cells. They now show that the fat particles bind to the breast cancer cell surface and are then taken into the cell, providing a large supply of fuel that drives growth of the cancer cells. Read the whole article in Science Daily HERE.

Dec. 16: Many U.S. women with breast cancer ultimately die of other causes, a new study finds, highlighting the need for survivors and their doctors to pay attention to overall health. In the new study, researchers found that among breast cancer patients who died five to 10 years after their diagnosis, only 38% of deaths were caused by the disease. HealthDay has the full article HERE.

Dec. 17: A large new study finds that women who lost weight after age 50 and kept it off had a lower risk of breast cancer than women whose weight remained stable. Women with sustained weight loss had a lower risk of breast cancer than those whose weight remained the same, and the more weight a woman lost, the lower her risk of breast cancer. See the full story HERE in HealthDay.

Dec. 23: Patients with breast cancer who use supplements during chemotherapy may be at an increased risk of recurrence and death, a new study suggests.Use of dietary supplements that boost levels of antioxidants, iron, vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids appeared to lower the effectiveness of chemotherapy, researchers reported. Read the full article in Reuters HERE.

, December 05, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

Nov. 3: Breast cancer could be detected up to five years before there are any clinical signs of it, using a blood test that identifies the body’s immune response to substances produced by tumor cells, according to new research. Read the full story in Science Daily HERE.

Nov. 13: According to a recent study, people who suffered a heart attack or heart failure then had a drastically increased risk of certain types of cancer, including breast cancer. Researchers noted that heart disease and cancer share risk factors, but they are interested in studying whether there’s something about heart problems that could trigger cancer, according to this article in HealthDay.

Nov. 14: Higher levels of mindfulness (a technique based on meditation traditions) were associated with less pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression and sleep disturbance for women with metastatic breast cancer, according to a small study. Read more in HealthDay HERE.

Nov. 25: (Note: this is not related to heart-health study mentioned above.) More than one in ten cancer patients do not die from their cancer but from heart and blood vessel problems instead, according to new research. For some cancers, like breast, prostate, endometrial, and thyroid cancer, around half will die from cardiovascular disease. Read the full story in Science Daily HERE.

, November 08, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

October 2: Deaths from breast cancer are still declining in the United States, even as more women are being diagnosed with the disease, a new report shows. Read more about these new statistics HERE in HealthDay.

October 11: Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida say a vaccine they have developed could be available within eight years that may not only stop the recurrence of breast and ovarian cancers, but prevent them from developing in the first place. Immunologists at Mayo already have two cancer vaccines against Triple Negative Breast Cancer and HER2 Positive Breast Cancer, respectively. They’re also working on a third against ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, a noninvasive breast cancer. Read the full story in Forbes HERE.

October 22: Men with breast cancer are more likely to die than their female counterparts, across all stages of disease, with the disparity persisting even when clinical characteristics, such as cancer types, treatment and access to care are considered, according to a new study. Read the story in Science Daily HERE.

October 22: Women diagnosed with breast cancer between two routine screenings have an increased risk for other types of cancer, according to a new study. Breast cancer detected between two routine screenings is called interval cancer, and it tends to be more advanced, more aggressive and to have a worse prognosis than cancers found during screenings. Read more in a HealthDay article HERE.

October 23: The US Food and Drug Administration recommended a “boxed warning” on labeling materials for breast implants. Boxed warnings, which alert health care providers and consumers to serious risks associated with a drug or device, are the strongest form of warning required by the FDA for labeling. (The FDA offered the recommendation for public comment and review as a draft guidance; it is not yet finalized.) Read the story on CNN HERE.

October 28: Drugs can be safely delivered to cancerous lymph nodes via the lymphatic system and then released inside the nodes using sound waves. Researchers tested the treatment on mice with metastatic breast cancer. Read more in the Science Daily article HERE.

, September 26, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

Sept. 2: Breast cancer medicines may force some cancer cells into ‘sleeper mode’, allowing them to potentially come back to life years after initial treatment. Researchers studied a group of breast cancer drugs called hormone treatments, and they say their research opens avenues for finding ways of keeping the cancer cells dormant for longer, or even potentially finding a way of awakening the cells so they can then be killed by the treatment. Read the full story HERE on Science Daily.

Sept. 9: According to a recent study, women who had experienced breast cancer and who followed a low fat diet with a corresponding increase in vegetables, fruit, and grains were 15–35% less likely to die from any cause. Read more in Medical News Today HERE.

Sept. 23: In a recent study led by University at Buffalo and University of Puerto Rico researchers, those studied who consumed sofrito (a condiment with primary ingredients of onion and garlic) more than once per day had a 67% decrease in risk compared to women who never ate it. The idea for the study stemmed from previous scientific evidence showing that eating onions and garlic may have a protective effect against cancer. Read the whole story in Science Daily HERE.

Sept. 26: Young survivors of breast cancer face higher risk for late congestive heart failure than their counterparts without cancer, according to study results published in Cancer. Read the full article in HemOnc Today HERE.

, September 03, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

Aug. 7: A new study found women who switched to poultry from beef, lamb or pork were 28 percent less likely to get breast tumors. It also shows those who ate the most red meat overall, had a 23 percent higher risk of the disease to those who rarely consumed it. Read the full story on the New York Post HERE.

Aug. 8: Electromagnetic fields might help prevent some breast cancers from spreading to other parts of the body, new research has found. Read the full story in Science Daily HERE.

Aug. 10: Researchers have been able to coax human breast cancer cells to turn into fat cells in a new proof-of-concept study in mice. The researchers took mice implanted with an aggressive form of human breast cancer, and treated them with both a diabetic drug called rosiglitazone and a cancer treatment called trametinib, which caused the cancer cells to change to fat cells. Read more in Science Alert HERE.

Aug. 26: A team of researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital has developed an innovative way to knock out a gene connected to triple-negative breast cancer (called Lipocalin 2) using the editing system CRISPR and has shown its potential for treating triple-negative breast tumors in mice. Read the full story in FierceBiotech HERE.

Aug. 29: A new analysis adds to the evidence that many women who take hormone therapy during menopause are more likely to develop breast cancer — and remain at higher risk of cancer for more than a decade after they stop taking the drugs. The full story is in STAT News HERE.

 

, August 02, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

July 6: Based on recent studies over the past decade, the old warnings about how breast cancer survivors should avoid the complication of lymphedema (which can cause irreversible swelling in the arm and often hardening of skin) have been dramatically relaxed. Read the full article in the Washington Post here to find out what experts are now recommending about this health issue.

July 9: Researchers found that non-Hispanic black women were more than twice as likely as white women to be diagnosed with so-called triple-negative breast cancers, while women under 40 were nearly twice as likely to be diagnosed with the aggressive cancer as those aged 50 to 64, according to the study published in Cancer. Read the complete article in Reuters here.

July 10: Using data from a person’s immune response, researchers have devised a blood test that may accurately predict the risk of breast cancer recurrence. The goal is for physicians and breast cancer patients to know the risk of the disease recurring within the next 3–5 years. Read the full article on Medical News Today here.

July 24: Following a request from the Food and Drug Administration, Allergan is recalling its textured breast implants worldwide. The move comes after 38 countries already recalled the implant because of the higher risk of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, or BIA-ALCL, a cancer of the immune system. Read more or watch a video on NBC.com here.

, June 27, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

June 12: Findings from a recent study suggest that having an unhealthy microbiome, and the changes that occur within the tissue that are related to an unhealthy microbiome, may be early predictors of invasive or metastatic breast cancer. Read the full story in Medical News Today HERE.

June 13: A new study shows that U.S.-born black women have as much as a 46% higher risk of developing an aggressive “triple-negative” strain of breast cancer than women who emigrated to the U.S. from Eastern Africa, Western Africa or the Caribbean. Read the full story in US News and World Report HERE.

June 18: Researchers had a “Eureka!” moment recently as they managed to synthesize a powerful anticancer compound — scientists have been trying to achieve this feat for more than 3 decades and hadn’t been successful until now. Read the full Medical News Today article HERE.

June 27: New research suggests that early risers have a slightly reduced risk of developing breast cancer. For night owls and people who tend to sleep more than the usual seven to eight hours nightly, the analysis suggested a slightly increased risk of breast cancer. HealthDay News has the full story HERE.

, May 30, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

Previous news of note: A new study suggests that rather than changing what they eat to prevent breast cancer tumor growth, a person may benefit from simply timing their meals differently. “Exploring the ability of time-restricted eating to prevent breast cancer could provide an inexpensive but effective strategy to prevent cancer impacting a wide range of patients and represents a groundbreaking advance in breast cancer research,” according to the lead researcher. Here’s the LINK to the story from Medical News Today.

May 15: In a new study of almost 49,000 women, researchers report evidence that a low-fat diet, similar to the kind doctors recommend for heart health, is also linked to a lower risk of dying from breast cancer. Here’s the LINK to the story in TIME.

May 19: Here’s an in-depth look at possible reasons for the disparity in breast cancer survival rates for African American women. One reason: they are not well represented in clinical trials. Here’s a LINK to the article in the Cheboygan Daily Tribune.

May 28: Researchers have genetically sequenced the secondary tumors of 10 women who died from breast cancer and found that there are usually just two or three waves of migration from the original tumor. This knowledge will help researchers who are looking to stop the cells from spreading in the first place. Here’s the LINK to the article in NewScientist.

May 29: Upending previous research that suggested the opposite, a new UK study shows that night shift work does NOT increase the risk of breast cancer. The study analyzed 102,869 women over 10 years. Here’s a LINK to the story in The Guardian.

, October 09, 2018 | More Post by

Our “A Calendar to Live By” features 11 survivors we serve through Here for the Girls programs and their inspiring, uplifting stories about their cancer journey. Get to know this month’s model, Katy!

48, Diagnosed at 45

No family history – no known genetic mutation

Breast cancer doesn’t always reveal itself as a lump. Katy first noticed that her nipple had become inverted, followed a few weeks later by a rash around it, so she headed to the gynecologist, who ordered testing. Mammograms and ultrasound showed nothing, but a biopsy revealed stage III inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Her treatment included chemotherapy, a bilateral mastectomy, and radiation. Katy is an independent and private person and, although she and her husband often help others, wasn’t comfortable receiving help.  That has changed, however, because of the great support she received from her “rays of light,” which include her friends, two children, and husband, who has been by her side since day one. Early on, Katy connected with another Boober! with IBC. “She has really helped me navigate this journey with support and answering questions,” she says. In Katy’s eyes, Beyond Boobs! support is different because “Boobers! don’t just sit around and feel sorry for themselves. It feels more like friends getting together for a ladies’ night in. There is lots of laughter and hugs.” Now Katy hopes she will be a ray of light to others.

, October 20, 2017 | More Post by

Welcome to our “Pink Link Stories” blog series! These stories are from women who are a part of (or support) Here for the Girls’ virtual Pink Link community for breast cancer survivors (pinklink.org). Each quarter, we offer a new writing prompt — this quarter, we asked women to share their thoughts about breast cancer awareness. We will publish a few of those entries* here (lightly edited for length and typos).

I am a 12 year survivor and even after all that time, I will never forget the devastating phone call 12 years ago: “Mary Jo, I am so sorry to tell you this, but you have breast cancer.” Those words changed my life and changed my life forever. Those words changed my life in the most wonderful way. I couldn’t have said this at the beginning, but because of all the love and support I received from God and many, many friends, I learned what life is really about! It’s about supporting one another through love and realizing that our purpose here has nothing to do with “stuff” and all that.

Each October when Breast Cancer Awareness month arrives, it’s a beautiful reminder to me of all the love and support I received. It reminds me, once again, to be there for others — through prayer, personal contact, a supporting note or a phone call. It reminds me to share my heart in loving ways because life is short. Hearing the words, “you have cancer” reminds one of their mortality. So, I use my time here on earth, to love others and to be that support system we all need.

Sadly, this month a best friend of mine was diagnosed with triple negative, stage 1 breast cancer. I thank God that I have walked the road before her and now I can be the source of love and support she desperately needs right now. The struggle is hard and so very frightening when it begins.

Pink… a color that is beautiful and a color we relate to breast cancer. That color, though, always reminds me of the journey… the struggle and the blessings this tough disease brings.

-Mary Jo